After graduation I quit competitive tennis for ten years and started a career as an educator. While teaching English at Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, I realized that even the cleverer boys interfered significantly with their ability to learn and their academic results. Later, as an officer in training in the U.S.S. Topeka, (vi) the depleted that was our education system and outdated how were our training methods. When I left the Navy I junte me with a group of idealists to found a liberal College of art to the North of Michigan. During his short five years of existence, I was more and more interested in learning how to learn and how to help others to learn. I studied the works of Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers at the end of the sixties and I studied learning theory in Clameront graduate school, but I did not have a practical learning success until I taught tennis in the summer of 1970, during a Sabbath education season.

He was interested in learning theory and that summer, I began to have multiple perspectives about the learning process. I decided to continue teaching tennis, and developed what came to be called the Interior (the Inner Game) game a way learn that you seemed tremendously increase the rate of student learning. He also had beneficial effects on my own game. Learn a little about the art of concentration He helped revitalize my level quickly, and soon I was playing better than ever. I realized after being professional club Meadowbrook in Seaside, California, realize that although it did not have too long to work my strokes, applying principles I taught could maintain my level of play, which was almost never defeated by anyone in the area. One day, after playing particularly well against a very good player, I asked myself what I would be competitions and tours. I felt safe with my game although I had not faced against players of high distinction.

So I enrolled me in a tournament at the Tennis Club in Berkeley where they compete players of the highest level. In the reviewed weekend, I drove to Berkeley with confidence, but when I arrived I began to question my own ability. Everyone there seemed measuring two meters and carry five or six rackets. I recognized many of the players for the tennis magazines, but none of them seemed to recognize me at my. The atmosphere was very other than that they breathed in Meadowbrook, my small pond where I was the boss frog. Suddenly I saw as my optimism before turned pessimism. He doubted my game. Why? Had something happened from the moment in which I left the club three hours earlier?